Blog December 2018

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DECEMBER 26 BOXING DAY

Posted On: December 26, 2018



December 26 is not only a day for Santa Claus to catch his breath but a public holiday known as Boxing Day in the United Kingdom and other British Commonwealth countries such as Australia, Canada and New Zealand. In spite of its peculiar name, Boxing Day has nothing to do with fisticuffs, the trashing of empty boxes left over from Christmas or the return of unwanted presents to department stores. The term is of British origin, and the Oxford English Dictionary traces its earliest print attribution to 1833, four years before Charles Dickens referred to it in “The Pickwick Papers.” The exact roots of the holiday name are unknown, but there are two leading theories, both of which are connected to charity traditionally distributed to lower classes on the day after Christmas.

One idea is that December 26 was the day centuries ago when lords of the manor and aristocrats typically distributed “Christmas boxes” often filled with small gifts, money and leftovers from Christmas dinner to their household servants and employees, who were required to work on December 25, in recognition of good service throughout the year. These boxes were, in essence, holiday bonuses. Another popular theory is that the Boxing Day moniker arose from the alms boxes that were placed in churches during the Advent season for the collection of monetary donations from parishioners. Clergy members distributed the contents of the boxes to the poor on December 26, which is also the feast of St. Stephen, the first Christian martyr and a figure known for acts of charity. (Ireland celebrates December 26 as St. Stephen’s Day.)

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OLD SCHOOL FLUSHING

Posted On: December 19, 2018


Back in the day, flushing an outboard with fresh water was done only one way. A set of "ear muffs" or "flush muffs" was fitted around the engine's gearcase to cover the water intakes, connected to a garden hose with a good water supply, and the engine was run for five to 10 minutes

Why Flush?

Salt and brackish water is a corrosive killer of the aluminum from which outboards are made, so flushing every time after saltwater use is a must. Left unchecked inside the cooling passages, saltwater will quickly build up and may cause cooling blockages, leading to overheating and, over time, can corrode an engine from inside out. All outboard manufacturers recommend flushing (according to the procedures outlined in the engine owner's manual) after every use in salt, brackish, dirty, or polluted waters. Operating an engine in sandy, silty, or muddy fresh water also dictates the need for periodic flushing.

The Old-School Way

Flush muffs are the most common way to flush an outboard; they're available at most marine stores and online resellers. They're inexpensive, and easy to use. Connect to a garden hose, fit the muffs over the engine's water intakes on the sides of the gear case, turn the water on, start the engine, and let it run. That's it, with the following precautions:

  • If your engine has additional water intakes that are not being directly fed water via the flushing muffs, they must be sealed off with a bit of duct tape, or overheating may occur.
  • If your engine doesn't have water intakes on the sides of the gear case, you will need a special type of flushing attachment that covers the front of the gear case. These can be purchased from aftermarket shops.
  • When attaching the muffs, be sure they cover the water inlets completely and don't pop or slide off when the water is turned on.
  • Be vigilant, and don't leave the engine while flushing. Watch the engine's "tell-tale" overboard water indicator to ensure that the engine is pumping water.
  • The engine should be kept in neutral and not run above a fast idle speed (1,000 rpm maximum).
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CHRISTMAS BELLS

Posted On: December 12, 2018

Traditions of Christmas Bells

Bells, especially Church Bells, have traditionally been associated with Christmas for a long time. In the Anglican and Catholic churches, the church day starts at sunset, so any service after that is the first service of the day. So a service on Christmas Eve after sunset is traditionally the first service of Christmas day! In churches that have a Bell or Bells, They are often rung to signal the start of this service.

In some churches around the world, it is traditional that the largest bell in the church is rung four times in the hour before midnight and then at midnight all the bells are rung in celebration.

In the Catholic Church, Christmas and Easter are the only times that Mass is allowed to be held at Midnight. It's traditional that at both midnight Masses, the church and altar bells too in many cases are rung while the Priest says the "Gloria" (Gloria in excelsis Deo).

Having a Mass at Midnight at Christmas dates back to the early church, when it was believed that Jesus was born at midnight, although there has never been any proof of this! A lot of Churches have midnight services on Christmas Eve, although not every church will have a mass or communion as part of the service.

In many Catholic countries such as France, Spain and Italy, the midnight mass service is very important and everyone tries to go to a service.

In Victorian times, it was very fashionable to go carol singing with small handbells to play the tune of the carol. Sometimes there would only be the bells and no singing! Handbell ringing is still popular today.

 

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