Blog January 2019

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GETTING MORE FROM YOUR SURVEY

Posted On: January 30, 2019

Seven Tips To Get More From A
Marine Survey

Survey illustration

1. If buying a boat, don't rely on an old survey that may not give a current representation of the boat. Insurance underwriters will normally not accept a survey older than six months.

2. Attend the survey and take the opportunity to ask questions and learn more about your new boat. Most surveyors are happy to talk about what they're finding and what needs to be done to correct any problems.

3. Don't select a surveyor on price alone; find one that has experience and one with whom you feel comfortable.

4. Boats don't pass or fail a survey. The buyer determines if the boat is acceptable or not, and the insurance company will list what must be done in order to provide coverage.

5. Even a brand-new boat will almost certainly have some recommendations from the surveyor, though most of them should be addressable through the builder's warranty.

6. Surveys include an approximate current fair-market value for use by lenders and insurance companies. This can serve as a price negotiation tool.

7. A survey is a useful guide for planning upgrades and repairs and allows you to prioritize your budget.

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STAYING SAFE IN 2019

Posted On: January 23, 2019

Rules-Of-The-Road Refresher For Boaters



Start the year right. Here are the rules that will help you avoid a collision.

Head on passing boats illustration
Head On: Keep right or steer to starboard. Pass port to port, like cars.
Boat crossing danger zone illustration
Crossing: Give way to a boat ahead and to starboard. If a boat is in your danger zone, defined as an arc measuring from zero to 112.5 degrees, alter course, slow, or stop.
Passing boats illustration
Passing: When overtaking another boat, give way and steer clear.

As you encounter another vessel in motion, ask yourself two questions: Do I have priority in the pecking order? And consequentially, am I the stand-on or give-way vessel? If two vessels have equal priority, follow the examples in the illustration.

The Pecking Order

A vessel lower on the list below must give way to those higher on the list. Generally, recreational powerboats must yield to other types of traffic.

1. Unable to steer
2. Limited turning ability
3. Restricted by draft (commercial ship)
4. Commercial boats engaged in fishing
5. Sail and human-powered boats
6. Recreational powerboats

Give-Way Boat (red): Must alter course and speed to avoid a collision.

Stand-On Boat (Green): Must maintain course and speed unless a risk of collision is imminent.

Aids to navigation mark the edges of a channel and define a course through deep(er) water. They typically don't appear side by side, as in this illustration, but rather are staggered on either side as necessary.

Aids to navigation illustration

Lighted marks are often found at headlands and at entrances to rivers or channels. Cans are always green and odd numbered, while nuns are cone-shaped on top, always red, and even numbered.

Similarly, green daybeacons are square and odd, while red daybeacons are triangular and even.

Orange and white markings indicate information or danger, including speed restrictions, shoals, or other hazards

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PROPS

Posted On: January 16, 2019

Three-Bladed Versus Four-Bladed Props


Three blades versus four? Stainless versus aluminum?

Just some of the questions to consider when choosing a new prop.

You may have noticed four-bladed props on boats at a marina or boat show and thought, "I wonder what that would do for my boat?" I often recommend a four-bladed prop to boat owners who enjoy tubing, water-skiing, and family outings. Four-bladed propellers have many benefits, including giving the boat more torque at the low end and in the mid-range, which is ideal for water-skiing and tubing. They also get the boat to plane quicker. That extra blade is pushing more water, making the boat get up and go. You may trade off a bit of efficiency due to increased drag, but you'll also get better bite for low-speed maneuvering as well.

Stainless Steel Versus Aluminum

Customers always ask about the differences between stainless-steel and aluminum propellers. Aluminum is a softer metal, so aluminum props have less ability to endure the pressure and demands of higher-horsepower, higher-torque motors. They break more easily, but they're relatively inexpensive and cost-effectively repairable. A stainless-steel prop lends itself to having a more customizable shape. If you look at the number of different stainless-steel props that are available, you'll see that they come in many different shapes and sizes. So if your boat can't turn up to its rated rpm, or you're not happy with another aspect of its performance, look into a different prop.

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TIPS FOR STAYING HEALTHY WHEN FLYING

Posted On: January 14, 2019



Chances are at some time you will be flying. So, whether it’s a vacation, business, personal, or all of the above, here are some tips to stay healthy in the New Year when you fly!

Thanks to  Morning Consult

Flying Tips:

DON’T DRINK THE WATER.

A survey sampling of 327 airplanes found that there was a high amount of E. coli in the on-board drinking water. You really need to bring your own water because even coffee and tea has shown traces of E. coli. For safety reasons, the water on a plane won’t be heated enough to kill off the bacteria. So, buy a bottle of water after you go through security. When you’re on board, only drink bottled water- one for every hour that you fly. This will help you be less hungry and will help you avoid feeling dehydrated when you get off the plane.

AVOID THE SEAT-BACK POCKET.

We’ve all done it- tuck our iPads in the seat-back pocket before we read the Sunday NY Times, or watch a movie. Or, we stick that crossword puzzle in there when we decide to take a nap.

Don’t.

That place is a haven for cold and influenza viruses. The reason: not everyone washes their hands, which is one of the top disease contributors in the entire world.

WIPE DOWN YOUR TRAY TABLE.

Always bring a pack of anti-bacterial wipes. A staphylococcus lives on these things and kills 20,000 Americans every year. Don’t think, “Hey, Susan- it’s not that manly to be carrying around a pack of wipes.” Trust me; I would be more worried about having a clean place to work over anything else.

 

EAT YOUR OWN FOOD.

FDA inspectors went into the kitchens of planes from major airlines and found the Listeria virus as well as swarms of cockroaches. But, forgetting that, even from a general nutrition perspective, airplane food is not good for you. These types of meals are packed with sodium and loaded with preservatives. When I travel I bring a natural protein bar, raw almonds, raw walnuts and even a piece of food. Avoid fast food when waiting at an airport terminal. What’s good is that a lot of larger airports these days offer a variety of food options.

BRING YOUR OWN BLANKET.

Many airlines won’t even provide blankets anymore, but if they do, use your own! There’s an Aspergillus virus that can cause pneumonia and lives in these blankets. The Wall Street Journal did a study in 2007 that revealed that blankets were only washed once every five to 30 days. How disgusting is that? If you forget a blanket, use your own jacket.

WASH YOUR HANDS.

Avoid airplane bathrooms at all costs. The CDC found that H1N1 and SARS epidemics may have been perpetuated throughout the United States by airplane bathrooms. Here’s why: when you flush the toilet air sprays up particles from urine, to airplane matter, and germs and other viruses. When someone doesn’t wash their hands, all of that material gets spread throughout the plane. If you’re on a longer flight and you can’t avoid the bathroom, close the toilet lid with a paper towel before flushing and then use hand sanitizer to “wash.” That dirty sink water will do you no good either.

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MARINE SURVEY PREPARATION

Posted On: January 09, 2019


Time and additional expense can be saved by preparing the vessel for inspection and making her more accessible.

IF YOU WANT TO SAVE AND HAVE THE INSPECTION GO WELL CONSIDER THIS.


Arrange to present a clean, shipshape boat, and have all papers and miscellaneous gear ready. If applicable, you will need to make arrangements with the marina to haul the vessel for bottom inspection, and retain a captain for sea trials. Lockers and cabin areas should be cleared of all miscellaneous gear.

The surveyor should never be asked to prepare a boat for inspection. The surveyor may request minor dismantling of interior ceilings, headliners, flooring, etc. in order to gain access to the suspected areas. Random removal and examination of below-the-waterline fasteners on wood boats may be required. Any dismantling and re-installation of parts should be performed by qualified personnel and is the responsibility of the person ordering the survey.

Written authorization from the owner may be needed to board and/or to remove part of the vessel. 

ONCE YOU RETAIN THE SURVEYOR, HE OR SHE WORKS ONLY FOR YOU AND REPORTS TO NO ONE ELSE. THE SURVEYOR IS THERE TO PROTECT YOUR INTERESTS!

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